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Santa Barbara Opioid Safety Coalition

We are a local community coalition dedicated to saving lives and preventing opioid misuse through expanding public education and media outreach, enhancing opioid surveillance, preventing overdose and promoting Naloxone distribution, promoting safe disposal practices, encouraging early intervention, and expanding treatment access and recovery throughout Santa Barbara County.

Santa Barbara Opioid Safety Coalition

We are a local community coalition dedicated to saving lives and preventing opioid misuse through expanding public education and media outreach, enhancing opioid surveillance, preventing overdose and promoting Naloxone distribution, promoting safe disposal practices, encouraging early intervention, and expanding treatment access and recovery throughout Santa Barbara County.

Welcome

The Santa Barbara Opioid Safety Coalition is a local community coalition in Santa Barbara County dedicated to saving lives and preventing opioid misuse. The coalition was formed in 2018 to help coordinate local efforts to respond to the opioid crisis. You can learn more about us here. This website was created to bring attention to the opioid issue in our community and provide resources to individuals seeking treatment for an opioid use disorder for themselves or a loved one, as well as information and resources for behavioral health professionals, physicians, and policymakers.

Although we are all aware by now that there is an opioid crisis, the impact continues to escalate. Nationally, 1.4 million people used prescription painkillers non-medically for the first time in the past year. The average age of these users was 21. Four out of five people who are addicted to heroin report that their addiction began with prescription pills. Despite the epidemic of opioid abuse in America, only 1 in 10 people with a substance use disorder receive treatment.  Every community is being impacted, and Santa Barbara is no exception. Almost twice a week, someone in Santa Barbara County dies from an overdose involving opioids.

We hope you find this website useful and welcome your feedback and inquiries. You may contact us via email.

News and Updates

“Fentanyl Is Forever” Campaign Launches in Santa Barbara County

In an effort to educate people in Santa Barbara County about the nationwide and local epidemic of fentanyl deaths, the Santa Barbara County Department of Behavioral Wellness has launched the “Fentanyl is Forever” campaign. The campaign’s website can be found at fentanylisforeversb.org.

The campaign, which features compelling videos from families and friends of victims, doctors, and health care administrators, seeks to convey how dangerous fentanyl is — much deadlier than other opioids: “Just a few grains of fentanyl are enough to kill you. Or your child.”

“Any pill or powder you get on the street may have fentanyl in it. All it takes to die is a few grains. Fentanyl gives no warnings. It has no smell, no special color. It has been showing up in other drugs on the street and at parties. Whether it’s your first time or your tenth time, it can too easily become your last time.”

The campaign also includes ads on local television, radio, and social media. Spread the word…fentanyl is forever.

Free Naloxone Distribution to the Community of Lompoc

YOR Place
646 N. H Street

Friday, October 28
3:30 – 5:30 PM
While Supplies Last

Learn more about Narcan and Overdose Response here.

YOR Place Lompoc

YOR Place Lompoc is a youth drop-in center located in the City of Lompoc to address opioid and stimulant use disorders among youth ages 12-24 years old and their families.  Services are located adjacent to the Family Service Agency at 646 N. H Street.

YOR Place Lompoc is supported by a federal grant under the State Opioid Response program, with funding provided by the California Department of Health Care Services.

For more information download the brochures and flyers below or email YORPlace@sbcbwell.org.

> Download YOR Place Lompoc Brochure in English
> Download YOR Place Lompoc Brochure in Spanish
> Download YOR Place Lompoc Flyer in English

Follow us on social media for regular updates!

Santa Barbara County Residents Can Now Order Free Naloxone

Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can stop an opioid overdose, including overdoses from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids. Naloxone is safe and easy to use. It is most often given as a nasal spray. Naloxone quickly stops an overdose by blocking the effects of opioids. It can restore normal breathing within 2 to 3 minutes in a person whose breath has slowed or stopped because of opioid overdose. More than one dose of naloxone may need to be given when stronger opioids like fentanyl are involved. Even after administering naloxone to someone overdosing, they will need medical help.

Thanks to a new effort launched by the Santa Barbara County Department of Behavioral Wellness, community members may request Naloxone at no cost for personal use by completing the Naloxone Now SB request form, or by calling (805) 681-5323. Requests will be processed within two business days and mailed within 3-5 business days.

Who should carry naloxone?

  • If you or someone you know is at increased risk for opioid overdose, especially those struggling with opioid use disorder (OUD), you should carry naloxone and keep it at home.
  • People who are taking high-dose opioid medications (greater or equal to 50 morphine milligram equivalents per day) prescribed by a doctor
  • People who use opioids and benzodiazepines together
  • People who use illicit opioids like heroin should all carry naloxone

Carrying naloxone is no different than carrying an EpiPen® for someone with allergies. It simply provides an extra layer of protection for those at a higher risk for overdose. Most states have laws that may protect a person who is overdosing or a person who calls for help.

Know the signs of overdose:

  • Difficult to wake up
  • Slowed breathing
  • Confusion
  • Blue or pale lips and fingernails

If you notice these signs, call 911 immediately and give naloxone. Learn more about Narcan and Overdose Response here.

Opioid Overdose Deaths Among Teens Have Skyrocketed Due to Fentanyl

April 12, 2022 – By Eli Cahan

Fentanyl was associated with 77% of adolescent overdose deaths in 2021. Opioid overdose deaths in adolescents rose far more rapidly than the general population between 2019 and 2021, according to a new study of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. The study found that deaths from opioid overdoses in teens ages 14 to 18 increased by 94% between 2019 and 2020 and by an additional 20% between 2020 and 2021.

>Read the full article here

Understanding Opioid Use Disorder

Opioids are meant to be used for the treatment of acute (short-term) pain, but they act in many ways in the brain and can be highly addictive. Unfortunately, these brain changes and the development of tolerance and withdrawal are not under a person’s control. The good news is that addiction to opioids is a treatable condition now medically recognized as Opioid Use Disorder.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

MAT is an approach that combines medication with support to address the behaviors and compulsive patterns that are associated with opioid addiction. Just as heart disease is treated using medication and lifestyle changes, MAT for Opioid Use Disorder, using the same approach, has proven to be the most effective way of helping a person get off of opioids and get back their life and health.

Find a Treatment Provider

Explore your treatment options and find a treatment provider that's right for your needs. Providers include doctors who prescribe Medication-Assisted Treatment and Behavioral Health providers who can help with therapeutic behavioral interventions, support your mental wellness, and address co-occurring mental health issues. Most providers accept Medi-Cal and insurance.

Recovery Support

Recovery support is the replacement of people, places and things that encourages substance abuse with positive support from friends and family, peers and treatment programs that encourage healthy lifestyles. That’s why recovery services are provided as part of all treatment services and include alumni groups, peer supports, professional check-ins and self-help group attendance.

Pain Management

Chronic pain can be devastating, and effective pain management is essential to get your life back. Opioids are not the first-line treatment for chronic pain. Talk to your doctor about ways to manage your pain that don’t involve prescription opioids, such as non-opioid pain relievers and certain anti-depressants, physical therapy and exercise, biofeedback, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Overdose Response

Opioid overdoses can often be reversed by administering Naloxone, an FDA-approved drug that can be given via intranasal spray or subcutaneous or intravenous injection. You can learn how to recognize the signs of an overdose and what to do in the case of an emergency. Learn where to get Naloxone and how to be prepared if you or someone you know has an Opioid Use Disorder.

Understanding Opioid Use Disorder

Opioids are meant to be used for the treatment of acute (short-term) pain, but they act in many ways in the brain and can be highly addictive. Unfortunately, these brain changes and the development of tolerance and withdrawal are not under a person’s control. The good news is that addiction to opioids is a treatable condition now medically recognized as Opioid Use Disorder.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

MAT is an approach that combines medication with support to address the behaviors and compulsive patterns that are associated with opioid addiction. Just as heart disease is treated using medication and lifestyle changes, MAT for Opioid Use Disorder, using the same approach, has proven to be the most effective way of helping a person get off of opioids and get back their life and health.

Find a Treatment Provider

Explore your treatment options and find a treatment provider that's right for your needs. Providers include doctors who prescribe Medication-Assisted Treatment and Behavioral Health providers who can help with therapeutic behavioral interventions, support your mental wellness, and address co-occurring mental health issues. Most providers accept Medi-Cal and insurance.

Recovery Support

Recovery support is the replacement of people, places and things that encourages substance abuse with positive support from friends and family, peers and treatment programs that encourage healthy lifestyles. That’s why recovery services are provided as part of all treatment services and include alumni groups, peer supports, professional check-ins and self-help group attendance.

Pain Management

Chronic pain can be devastating, and effective pain management is essential to get your life back. Opioids are not the first-line treatment for chronic pain. Talk to your doctor about ways to manage your pain that don’t involve prescription opioids, such as non-opioid pain relievers and certain anti-depressants, physical therapy and exercise, biofeedback, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Overdose Response

Opioid overdoses can often be reversed by administering Naloxone, an FDA-approved drug that can be given via intranasal spray or subcutaneous or intravenous injection. You can learn how to recognize the signs of an overdose and what to do in the case of an emergency. Learn where to get Naloxone and how to be prepared if you or someone you know has an Opioid Use Disorder.

How Are Opioids Affecting Santa Barbara County?

Almost twice a week, someone in Santa Barbara County dies from an overdose involving opioids. A review of data from the county coroner showed that 101 overdose deaths in 2021 involved opioids. Fentanyl was involved in 74% of these deaths. Over the past four years (2018-2021), there have been at least 1,101 overdose reversals from Naloxone administration, according to self-report data. Please visit our Data Dashboard to learn more and stay up-to-date on the impact of opioids in Santa Barbara County.

How Can You Get Involved?

Please explore this website’s  continually updated resources for youth, parents and families, physicians and behavioral health professionals, and policymakers.

Learn more about how the coalition is tackling this issue and how you can help by ensuring you safely dispose of presciption medications and keep them secure at home.

How Are Opioids Affecting Santa Barbara County?

Almost twice a week, someone in Santa Barbara County dies from an overdose involving opioids. A review of data from the county coroner showed that 101 overdose deaths in 2021 involved opioids. Most of these deaths (74%) were due to Fentanyl. Over the past three years (2018-2020), there have been at least 1,101 overdose reversals from Naloxone administration, according to self-report data. Please visit our Data Dashboard to learn more and stay up-to-date on the impact of opioids in Santa Barbara County.

How Can You Get Involved?

Please explore this website’s  continually updated resources for youth, parents and families, physicians and behavioral health professionals, and policymakers.

Learn more about how the coalition is tackling this issue and how you can help by ensuring you safely dispose of presciption medications and keep them secure at home.

Coalition Member Organizations